Featured image: A card from the Anderson family collection of 1920’s Christmas cards

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Shire-wide news extracts from the Moruya Examiner of 8 December 1917, provided by the Moruya & District Historical Society:

MORUYA ANNUAL RACES – The Officials have issued the programme for their annual two days’ race meeting which takes place on the Moruya course on Monday and Tuesday, 4th and 5th of February, 1918. The Moruya Cup carries 55 sovereigns, and the Town Plate, which is listed for the second day, is worth 35 sovereigns. A Jumpers’ Flat Race of 20 sovereigns on the first day and a Hurdle Race of 30 sovereigns on the second day are also attractive items. Altogether the programme is a credit to the Club and District. A list of the prizes, regulations and all particulars can be obtained on application to the secretary, Mr. Frank Flanagan.

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ACCIDENT – Whilst riding after stock, Mr. “Bob” Higgins, of Araluen, sustained a fractured rib through his horse falling. The patient was taken to the Braidwood hospital where he is now reported to be doing well.

JERVIS BAY LAND SALE – We have been sent an artistic plan of Jervis Bay City Estate which is to be sold by Hardy and Gorman at their rooms, 133 Pitt Street, Sydney, on Monday next at 11:30 am. The plan can be inspected at this office.

SUNDAY TRADING  – Last month the bench, composed of local magistrates, granted the following persons a licence to trade on Sundays – E. Corbett, G. Chewying, and H. Fordham. Gancsha Tabo was granted a Hawker’s licence at the same court.

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George Chewying’s shop in Queen Street, Moruya

POSSE OF POLICE – Owing, no doubt, to a report by Mr. Oakes to the authorities re the disturbance which followed his and Captain Millard’s Conscription meeting, held in the Mechanics’ Hall last week, quite a posse of distinguished Police Officers honored (?) our proverbially orderly and well conducted little township with their presence on Wednesday night, presumably to see that law and order were observed and the Conscriptionist – who was announced to address a public meeting that night – and his supports were preserved from molestation. The official visitors were : Inspector Saunders (Braidwood), Sergeant Face (Araluen), First-class Constable Barry (Narooma), and Constable Wilson (Braidwood).

CONSCRIPTION MEETING – Mr. W. T. Dick, M.L.C. formerly for some years State Member of Newcastle, addressed a public meeting in the Mechanic’s Hall on Wednesday night, in favour of Mr. Hughes’ Conscription Referendum. Mr. R. L. Dawson occupied the chair and introduced Mr. Dick to the audience, which was a very small one at the time, only about nine persons being present, but this number gradually increased before the close of the address by about twenty more.

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A “YES” conscription poster designed to appeal to rural voters

DEUA RIVER

– Alderman Burke, M.L.A., addressed an anti-conscription meeting here on Saturday and was accorded a patient and attentive hearing. He said he was entirely opposed to the application of conscription of Australians for foreign service and adjured all those present to vote “No” on December 20th, not so much as to nark “Little Billy” as to save Australia from military despotism.

– Private J. E. Turner, of Deua River, after spending a few weeks in Bethnal Green Military Hospital, London, to which he was admitted suffering from trench fever, has returned to the firing line. Pte. Turner is and avowed anti-conscriptionist.

– Alderman Burke, M.L.A., in a chat with this writer at Deua River on Saturday, said that Billy Hughes was the greatest Sian Feiner in Australia the meaning of the word being “all for self.” – Fermanagh Mallon, Merricumbene, via Moruya.

BODALLA – (From our Correspondent).

– On Friday evening November 30t a very successful social was held in the local Hall in aid of funds for the Bodalla Brass Band. First class music was provided by the band, the Bulgarie Trio, Miss Walsh and Mr. J. Lipscombe. The prize for the fancy dress was won by Miss Linda Marsden, who looked “just the thing” as Australia. The proceeds amounted to about £10.

– The Tennis Club have started playing again and local enthusiasts may be seen on the court in the early hours of the morning as well as afternoons.

Eighteen 100 years ago booklets containing articles for the years 1899 to 1916 are available ($5 ea) from the Society’s rooms. Copies of local newspapers from the 1860s to date can be viewed at the Society’s Family History Research Centre (Ph 4474 3224) situated at the rear of the Museum in Campbell St. Moruya (www.mdhs.org.au).

The Moruya Museum houses a collection of furniture, books, artefacts and memorabilia that is intended to show visitors something of the lives of the ordinary people of this community from the middle of the nineteenth century. Most items on display were donated by local families.

To explore the museum’s online collection click HERE.

In our small collection of exquisite embroidered greeting cards, or World War 1 Silks, is this wonderful Christmas card sent by John Henry (Harry) Keyte to his sister Sarah May (known as May) Louttit nee Keyte. In 1917 May and her husband Sid Louttit* were living at Kiora.

The postcard was sent from France on 18 October 1917. While it must have been extremely difficult for Harry to send this card from the trenches of the Western Front, it would have been received by his sister May with real joy and relief in the knowledge that her brother was still alive on the other side of the world.

The beautiful embroidery on these postcards, very popular during WW1, was produced by French women in their own homes, probably to provide some kind of income during these difficult times. Silk mesh was used to embroider the designs, which often featured floral designs, as well as flags and military insignia that were meaningful to the soldiers who bought and sent them. The embroidered silk was then sent to be mounted onto card at factories. According to the AWM, about ten million of these were made between 1915 and 1919. The soldiers used them to write home short notes to their wives, sisters, mothers and fathers.

Cards like this are important examples of personal communication from the the First World War. The fact that this card was preserved as a treasure within a family for so long, indicates how important such brief notes were to the family at home.

Post Card from France
The embroidered “Silk”
Postcard from France back
The brief note wrotten to his sister May Louttit
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Private Keyte Photo Shirley Jurmann Collection

Harry Keyte (1882 – 1948)_

John Henry ( Harry) Keyte was born in Majors Creek in 1882.  His parents were John Keyte and Sarah Keziah nee Cook. The Keyte family moved to Turlinjah, just opposite to the turn off to Tuross Head. when Harry was approx. 12.

Harry enlisted on 1 August 1915 and his unit embarked from Sydney, New South Wales, on board HMAT A14 Euripides on 2 November 1915.

Harry returned to Australia in 1920 along with a war bride (Gladys Maud) from England and they were to have eight children.

Harry’s service records and his obituary mention long bouts of illness caused by the war; most likely caused through gassing.

He died on the 10 February, 1948 aged  66.

Left: This photo in uniform was apparently taken just before Harry left Australia for the war. It was sent from Egypt 30/11/1915.

 

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Harry and Gladys Keyte. Photos Shirley Jurmann Collection
John and Sarah Keziah Keyte
Harry’s parents – John and Sarah Keziah Keyte (nee Cook) Photo Shirley Jurmann Collection

* Sid and May Louutit bought the property “Braemar” in 1924. Read a previous post:    Lost Moruya – Braemar Farm Homestead

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Shire-wide news extracts from the Moruya Examiner of 1 December 1917, provided by the Moruya & District Historical Society:

NO-CONSCRIPTION – On Tuesday night Mr. Cecil Whitmore, a nonconscriptionist organiser, addressed fairly large gathering in Page Street, immediately in front of the Mechanics reading room, against Mr. Hughes’ Referendum proposals. At the same time Senator Oakes and Captain Millard were holding a conscriptionist meeting in the Mechanics’ Hall. We have received no report of Mr. Whitmore’s meeting but judging by the loud cheering which punctuated his lengthy address, the audience must have been most sympathetic and appreciative.

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The Moruya Mechanics’ Institute where Senator Oakes and Captain Millard’s “conscriptionist meeting” was held. Following the meeting the chairman had eggs pelted at him by local youths. (See the article below)

EGG-THROWING – A number of youths, whose fathers should tie them up to the bedpost and flail that portion of their anatomy upon which they are supposed to sit, followed the chairman of the conscriptionists meeting on Tuesday night and, we are told, pelted him with eggs. Whether the hen-fruit was green or over-ripe makes very little difference, the action was a decidedly cruel one.

DEATH – During the week, not only the town, but the whole district mourned the loss of one of its most popular citizens. We refer to Mr. Crayton Burns, whose untimely death took place at his residence, “Sunnybrae,” Mullenderree on Monday evening, at the comparatively young age of 48 years. Mr. Burns was a native of Moruya, having been born in Queen Street, where his father, the late Mr. William Burns, kept a general store, on the allotment that Ryan’s Club House Hotel now stands. A few years after the family removed to Parramatta, where Mr. Crayton married. About four years ago he returned to Moruya and took up a position at Emmott’s Beehive Store.

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Ryan’s Clubhouse Hotel, Queen Street Moruya

NERRIGUNDAH ROBBER – A man who has committed several robberies, commencing at Tilba, has been leading the police a merry chase across the Victorian border. He is said to have out telegraph wires between Eden and Orbost, and committed robberies at private homesteads on his way down through Nimmitabel and Bombala districts to Rockton. A number of police and trackers were on his trail, and hit upon several of his deserted camps. At one of these some books on military matters and explosives were found. It is surmised that the man is a Russian deserter from the military camp in Sydney, if so he is described as 27 years of age, dark, and with hazel eyes. – Candelo “Record.”

LETTER HOME – Pte Phil Knight in writing home on 29th September, says: –

I expect long before you receive this you will have both the official and Aunt’s cable telling you I am wounded. I was wounded on Sept. 20th, about 36hours after we had “hopped over,” consolidated, and were holding our strong point. We were to be relieved and with six others were going as advance guards to the dug-outs in reserve just behind the lines. I had just given over my ammunition, bombs, etc., and was stepping over a chap lying in the bottom of the trench trying to get a bit of sleep, when I was cracked on the leg and fell on the chap at the bottom. My leg doubled up a treat. The same shell got two others also. The boys in the trench were most kind to me and sent immediately for the stretcher bearers, who soon had me to the dressing station, and from there to the casualty clearing station where I went under chloroform. The piece of shrapnel was extracted and given to me. I expect I will be here some time and then go to “Blighty,” so they tell me. This hospital is an American one and the sisters are very nice and kind.

HARBOURS AND RIVERS – Mr. Vowell, Chief Engineer of Harbours and Rivers south of Wollongong, passed through Moruya on Wednesday for Narooma, whither he has gone to inspect the entrance to the harbour there, reported to be almost silted up.

MUSICAL EXAMINATION – At the London College of Music Examination held at Bermagui on November 24th, the following girls passed successfully:- Senior – Eileen Bishop, Jessie M. Mercer; Intermediate – Marion A. Bate, Edna M. Taylor; Elementary – Stella McMillan, Norah Storman and Winnie Bate, all being pupils of Mrs. Preddy, A.L.C.M., of Wagonga.

Eighteen 100 years ago booklets containing articles for the years 1899 to 1916 are available ($5 ea) from the Society’s rooms. Copies of local newspapers from the 1860s to date can be viewed at the Society’s Family History Research Centre (Ph 4474 3224) situated at the rear of the Museum in Campbell St. Moruya (www.mdhs.org.au).

The Moruya Museum houses a collection of furniture, books, artefacts and memorabilia that is intended to show visitors something of the lives of the ordinary people of this community from the middle of the nineteenth century. Most items on display were donated by local families.

To explore the museum’s online collection click HERE.

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Shire-wide news extracts from the Moruya Examiner of 24 November 1917, provided by the Moruya & District Historical Society:

AN OUTSPOKEN SOLDIER – Private Oswald Harper, a young Moruya native, son of Mr. C. A. Harper and Mrs. Harper, now of Ashfield, in writing home says, among other things:-

“War is hell, but the only way to end it is to exterminate the Hun, that is what we are fighting for, and it will easily be done if those in power at home back us up, but party squabbles and petty squabbling are disheartening to a soldier at the front. He undergoes the most terrible hardships and lives under frightful conditions, no knowing what moment will be his last, does so in the hope that he will be relieved some time and food and sleep will soon be his. He has absolute confidence in his officers and commanders. Why shouldn’t he possess the same in his Government and in his countrymen?”

Private Harper it might be said has been dangerously wounded since the above was written and was an inmate of the Cumberland Hospital, but is now in the convalescent stage although still under a specialist for his hearing. He was in the famous Bullecourt battle where the Australians distinguished themselves. It is feared he will be permanently deaf. The bullet entered the back of the head and travelled on to the left eye, splintering all it came in contact with. Two and a half inches of temporal bone was removed. The bullet after lodging in the arch over the eye dropped down into the cheek. He had to undergo two serious operations, almost hopeless, but he pulled through! It proves what marvellous advances have been made in modern surgery during this war.

PROMOTION – Mr. Leslie Ross, son of Mr. J. Ross has been promoted to Flight Lieutenant in the Flying Corps.

LT James Stuart Leslie Ross 589 Australian Flying Corps A.I.F. – Photo courtesy of AWM
LT James Stuart Leslie Ross 589 Australian Flying Corps A.I.F. – Photo courtesy of AWM

KILLED IN ACTION – Private E. J. Sebbens of Mogo, previously reported missing, is now reported killed. We extend our sympathy to the relative of the plucky young Mogoite who has paid the supreme sacrifice for his King and Country.

ANTI-CONSCRIPTION – The public meeting convened by advertisement for Monday night to protest against Mr. Hughes’ Conscription Referendum was unquestionably one of the largest we have ever seen in Moruya. The Shire Hall could not accommodate more than about a third of those present with seats. Mr. G. Hanscom was called to the chair, and in a brief and sensible address explained the cause of the meeting. It was then unanimously decided to form an Anti-Conscription League, and the following officers were appointed, viz., Mr. Gregg Bishop President; Mrs. J. Heffernan (Mullenderree) Vice President; Mrs. G. Constable and Miss “Katie” Heffernan Joint Hon Secretaries, and Mr. P. Hoolahan Treasurer. Another meeting has been called for Wednesday, the 28th inst.

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PERSONAL AND OTHERWISE

– Persons making false statements in connection with the Referendum are to be prosecuted.

– Mr. Hughes explains the compulsory reinforcements scheme covers men between the ages of 20 and 44 inclusive, and that a man will be liable to be called up until he has attained his 45th birthday.

– Reported that over a dozen mines have been picked up in the vicinity of Gabo. One brought up recently got away, and finally drifted ashore near Black Head, where a number of men were camped procuring grass-tree gum. When the mine hit the rock, about midnight, it exploded, throwing pieces over 200 yards inland, many of which fell in the camp, and the men thought the enemy was bombing them. Needless to say, there was a general stampede of men and horses. – Pambula “Voice.”

OYSTER DISEASE – A disease has attacked the oysters in parts of the Bermagui river, and it is estimated some hundreds of bags have died. A peculiarity of the disease is that it affects the oysters in patches, and is apparently new to the river. – Cobargo “Chronicle.”

RAIN FALL – Nice steady rain commenced falling on Wednesday night and continued without cessation up until 10 o’clock on Thursday night, giving the nice and acceptable record of 227 points in Moruya.

Eighteen 100 years ago booklets containing articles for the years 1899 to 1916 are available ($5 ea) from the Society’s rooms. Copies of local newspapers from the 1860s to date can be viewed at the Society’s Family History Research Centre (Ph 4474 3224) situated at the rear of the Museum in Campbell St. Moruya (www.mdhs.org.au).

The Moruya Museum houses a collection of furniture, books, artefacts and memorabilia that is intended to show visitors something of the lives of the ordinary people of this community from the middle of the nineteenth century. Most items on display were donated by local families.

To explore the museum’s online collection click HERE.

A LETTER TO THE EDITOR FROM  “LEFT-TENANT” FRED HUTCHINGS

NOTE: On 10 November 1917 a letter from Sapper Herbert  Frederick  (Fred) Hutchings was published in the Moruya Examiner. Fred was a local boy from Bergalia where his father was a farmer and the manager of the Cheese Factory. He enlisted in October 1915 at the age of 27. Fred’s service record shows that he was 6 feet 1 inches tall, had blue eyes and brown hair.

By the time this letter was written, on 26 August 1917, Fred had transferred from the Light Horse to the 1st Field Squadron Engineers (June 1917).

The post features photographs that Fred Hutchings took while in Egypt and Palestine, as well as scans of postcards that he bought as souvenirs. These photos and cards are found in the Fred Hutchings Collection at the Moruya Museum.

FRED

In the first paragraph of the letter Fred Hutchings gives us a glimpse of his sense of humour. He makes it clear that he is not a Lieutenant but rather he is a “left-tenant” with

Sir,- A friend sent me a clipping of the “Examiner” some time ago, on which Private Kevans finds grievous fault with a letter written by me some time last year. It was highly interesting and amusing to me as he was laboring under a grave error. Whose fault it is I can hardly say. He imagines that I am a Lieutenant. Well I am not! But I am a “left-tenant” and I pay the rent too so the landlady is satisfied.

One of the themes in Fred’s letter  is that being a Mounted Engineer was not as easy as it sounded. He acknowledges that his life as a lighthorseman and now mounted engineer in Egypt and Palestine is not as not as difficult as that of the infantry in the trenches of France. At the same time, he stresses that horses are demanding and sometimes difficult animals.

And as far as the Australian infantry in France goes I don’t know what sort of a spin they get. If it’s anything like the Imperials get here I don’t envy them. I’m a lighthorseman – or at least I was – until a few months ago, then I transferred to the Mounted Engineers. I can well imagine dismounted men envying the mounted. Still I know many mounted men who would sooner be among the infantry, but are unable to transfer from their units. Horses require a lot of attention, so does the saddlery. Just imagine yourself camped on the sea beach and endeavouring to keep your stirrup irons and buckles bright, and your leather work in good order. At other times you find yourself camped five or six miles from water. That means two trips a day, 20 miles just for water alone. Mounted units mean plenty of work, and sometimes the horses are very cranky, and they kick mighty hard too. I should know because I’m in hospital now through a severe contact on the shin with the extremity of a horse’s leg.

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Nurses at the 14th Australian General Hospital at Abbassia on the outskirts of Cairo. Fred was sent to this hospital after the “severe contact on the shin with the extremity of a horse’s leg”. This photo can be found on the first page of Fred’s 1917 diary . The diary is also in the MDHS Collection
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Horses of the 2nd Lighthorse Brigade at Urgani
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Even though Fred wrote about the attention that the horses needed, the ‘country boy from Bergalia’ must have been upset at the sight of these dead horses killed following a bombing raid on the 3rd Light Horse Brigade.   MDHS Collection

Fred briefly touched on some of the sights that he saw during his service. His time in Palestine obviously triggered memories from bible stories and his old history books.

After the stunt at Marjar last year the regiment had a few weeks at the canal, then we went out on the Sinai desert and gradually worked up the coast to Gaza in Palestine. This took us nine months and during that time I never missed a day. Palestine is a very interesting place, the old crusaders had a great fancy for it. Quite a lot of their work may be seen yet, and the old biblical celebrities did some mighty wonders too, but that’s another story.

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The Mount of Temptation overlooking the Jordan Valley
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A mosque
Crusaders church
Crusaders’ Church, Khan Yunis

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Fred also writes about the troop’s “summer fashions” in the heat of the desert.

This summer fashion with us when in camp was “shorts” and a hat, of course we nearly all wore shirts and boots as well, because the sand and dirt would burn too much without some covering, but we did without as much as possible.

Jim Sounders
Trooper James Munro (Jim) Saunders –
2nd & 6th Regiments, Light Horse Brigade
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Signallers, 6th Regiment Light Horse Brigade

I’m not aware that I made such a rash statement as to say that woolen sox could not be worn in Egypt. We always wear them, unless we are in camp, then we probably have neither boots nor sox on

Like any soldier Fred Hutchings thought about food – or the lack of it!

Speaking of “scram”, I may say that for the last nine months’ campaign we’ve not had “bully” and biscuits at any one time for more than a week. Sometimes the issue rations are not too good, still we are never in a place long enough before we can supplement our larder from the A.I.F., E.E.F., or Y.M.C.A. canteens. It requires cash, but what of that. We get 10 piastres per day – if we’re good and obedient.

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Clever marketing or the Aussie seal of approval? The restaurant’s name is the “NEW BELGIUM ARMENIAN RESTAURANT – THIS JOINT IS FAIR DINKUM” – Fred Hutchings Collection, MDHS

I am, yours truly.
SAPPER H. F. HUTCHINGS
26/8/1917

As part of Remembrance Day 2017, local military enthusiast Gary Traynor led a large  and very successful tour of the concrete bunkers built during World War 2 by the RAAF as part of the coastal defence system against Japanese and German invasion.

The day began with the Remembrance Day service, moved around to the Remembrance Room of the Moruya Museum where Gary spoke and finished with the tour of the bunkers. Approximately 100 people attended this tour.

Gary must be thanked for organising this event. His knowledge of this important and often overlooked part of our town’s history, and his dedication to sharing that knowledge with the entire community, ensured that the event was a success.

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The day commenced with the Remembrance Day ceremony
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Gary Traynor giving his talk in the Remembrance Room. The interest was so
great that people were standing on the stairs to listen
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On the stairs…..
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Visitors looking at some of the World War 1 memorabilia in the Remembrance Room.
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Gary Traynorgiving talk at the Ammunition Bunker with a Japanese Mountain Gun on display. There was a simulated firing with a blank cartridge with lots of smoke and a very loud bang!
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Gary giving talk at the WW2 bunker now used by the Moruya Pistol Club
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Japanese mountain artillery gun
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Approximately 100 people attended the tour of the bunkers
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Inside the bunker now used by the Pistol Club
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This bunker in the middle of the Moruya Race Track is designated Bomb
Dump #2
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A poem about the Air Raid Hotel was read during the afternoon

Thanks Gary Traynor. The tour of the Moruya Concrete RAAF Bunkers that you organised for today was excellent. I am proud to be living in this area that was a significant component of the defense of Australia from the Japanese and German maritime forces, 1941 to the end of 1944.

 

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Hopefully Saturday’s tour will be the first of other similar events.

The Moruya Museum houses a collection of furniture, books, artefacts and memorabilia that is intended to show visitors something of the lives of the ordinary people of this community from the middle of the nineteenth century. Most items on display were donated by local families.

To explore the museum’s online collection click HERE.

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Shire-wide news extracts from the Moruya Examiner of the week ending Friday 3 November 1917, provided by the Moruya & District Historical Society:

fullsizeoutput_2cfFIRE – Early on Sunday morning the Flat Rock Sawmill near Brooman owned by Mr. Allen, was totally destroyed by fire. The plant was insured.

ILLNESS – We are sorry to report that Mrs. Currie, of Araluen, and daughter of Mr. M. Keating, of Mullenderree, is again in a precarious state of health.

SALE at BODALLA – R. H. Harvison’s big clearance sale of Mrs. S. Baldwin’s household furniture, horses, fowls, farming implements, etc., will take place at their Bodalla residence today, commencing at 2 p.m. sharp.

DEATH – On Thursday of last week the daughter of Mr. and Mrs. P. Heffernan, of Moggendoura, died at the age of eight days. Much sympathy is expressed for the bereaved parents in the loss of their first-born.

HONOR ROLL – Mr. G. Riley, of Narooma, received official word last week that his son, Pte. Earnest. H. Riley, who had been reported missing since April 11th, was killed in action on that date. This young hero enlisted at the outbreak of the war, but was rejected owing to defective eyesight. In May 1916, he again gave his name in and passed. His age was 25 years.

RETURNED HEROES – A correspondent from Wagonga writes: – Amongst the returned soldiers last week I noticed some boys from this district. One well known identity from Eurobodalla was Cpl. Esmonde W. Coman, eldest son of Mr. D. Coman; also Spr. A. J. Brothers, of Wagonga, who was wounded and gassed at Messines, Belgium, last June. Spr. Brothers belongs to the Australian Field Engineers who rendered great service at Messines and Hill 60 on June 7th 1917.

ELECTRIC LIGHTING – The Braidwood freezing works submitted a proposition to the Municipal Council to electrically light the town, but the civic body decided not to entertain it for the present.

TENNIS MATCH – The third match between the Moruya and Convent Tennis clubs was played at the former’s court on Wednesday and resulted in a win for the Moruya one by six sets.

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Moruya Tennis Club. Daisy walter is standing oat the top right while  Ilma Walter is sitting bottom left.

PERSONAL and OTHERWISE. –

– The gun licence fee in State forests has been reduced from 2s 6d to 1s per week.
– Everythig to delight the eye, ear and mouth at the Cafe Chantant on Wednesday.
– Pte. Ernie Wise of Narooma, was severely wounded during the recent heavy fighting in Flanders.
– Messrs. L. and W. Stafford enlisted at Cobargo last week. Their father has been at the front for some time.
Pte. Walter Francis Coman, aged 23 years, youngest son of Mr. and Mrs. E. J. Coman, of Albion Park (formerly of Nerrigundah) and nephew of Mrs. R. Heffernan, of Yarragee, was killed in action in France on 11 April.
– Private John W. Flack, of Major’s Creek, has answered his last roll call.
– The Rev. Father Stephens, a young priest and a native of Sydney, has succeeded Father Walsh at Pambula.
– In Conversation with Pte. Jack Beathe the other night he said that he was unconscious for three weeks after being gassed.
– I. and J. O’Reilly reports the sale of Mr. W. Blacka’s dairy herd to Mr. C. Keating.
Lieut. Horace Rex, of Braidwood, has paid the supreme sacrifice on the blood-stained fields of France. He was a cousin of Mr. Rae Mater of Buckenboura.

PECULIAR ACCIDENT – On Monday last Mr. W. Crapp had a peculiar accident happen to his timber waggon at the water hole near the cemetery. He had been giving his horses a drink and when in the act of driving them out, one of the animals swerved, suddenly causing the waggon to turn a complete somersault. One of the wheels went right under the end of the culvert, and was jambed so tightly against the stringer that the decking had to be removed before the jinker could be extricated.

DEPARTURE – Mr. E. L. Arnett, of Cooboora, with his wife and child, left here on Thursday for Nashua, Richmond River, where he intends purchasing a farm. Mr. Arnett has leased his Cooboora property to Mrs. M. Mylott, of Tuross.

Eighteen 100 years ago booklets containing articles for the years 1899 to 1916 are available ($5 ea) from the Society’s rooms. Copies of local newspapers from the 1860s to date can be viewed at the Society’s Family History Research Centre (Ph 4474 3224) situated at the rear of the Museum in Campbell St. Moruya (www.mdhs.org.au).

The Moruya Museum houses a collection of furniture, books, artefacts and memorabilia that is intended to show visitors something of the lives of the ordinary people of this community from the middle of the nineteenth century. Most items on display were donated by local families.

To explore the museum’s online collection click here.

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Shire-wide news extracts from the Moruya Examiner of 27 October 1917, provided by the Moruya & District Historical Society:

WOUNDED – Mr. M. Keating received word last week that his youngest son, Private Jack Keating, had been wounded in the hand and now in Beaufort Hospital England.

PROMOTION – We are pleased to report that Pte. Harry Duncan of Eurobodalla, (who sailed just a year ago to take his place in the defence of the Empire) has gained distinction on the battlefield. He received his first stripe “Lance-Corporal,” about three months ago and has since been promoted to full Corporal and has been recommended by his Officer for the Military Medal. Harry has been in the trenches for six months, and when last writing was well and in the best of spirit. His mate, Pte. Roley Lavis, was wounded at Bullecourt and has been in England for a few months but is now, we understand back in France.

3798180MILITARY MEDALLISTPte. Roy Bailey, who has returned to Cobargo after serving in Gallipoli, Suez and in France, was tendered a great welcome home. This young hero (who is a native of Moruya and a cousin of Mrs. G. Cheeseman here) was severely wounded at Pozieres, and it was in action there that he won the military medal. Mr. T. Kennelly presided at the “Welcome Home,” and at a signal Sergt. Branch and Messrs. M. O’Reilly, C. P. Harris and V. Henry shouldered Pte. Bailey and carried him from the entrance of the hall to the platform. Pte. Bailey was presented with a cheque from the Mumbulla and Dromedary Wounded Soldiers’ Fund.

KILLED IN ACTION – Another of our brave boys has paid the supreme sacrifice. Word reached here last week that Private Fred Brooks, son of Mr. C. Brooks of Buckenboura, had been killed in action. This young hero is well known in Moruya, he having owned and raced the pretty little mare Hobble Skirt a few years ago. Private Brooks was a quiet, unassuming and honourable, and a fine specimen of Australian manhood. His parents have the sympathy of the whole district in the loss of their noble son.

SOLDIERS’ WELCOME – The War Chest Committee will tender Privates Jack Beathe and William Griffiths a welcome home on Monday night, next, 29th inst., in the Mechanics Hall. These two young heroes were gassed in France and are here on week-end leave.

NERRIGUNDAH – (From our Correspondent.) Last week the sad news was received by Mr. and Mrs. Cole that their son, Pte. Alfred Cole, had been killed in action. Alf was one of our brave lads who had volunteered in the early stages of the great war, and had been on active service at the front for the past 12 months. During that time he had been through a number of battles, upholding the honor of Australia.

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Mr. C. Wilson also received news that his son, Pte. Frank Wilson had been severely wounded. Frank, at the commencement of the war, was anxious to join the colors but he was under the age. He made many earnest appeals to his parents for their consent, and though it was hard to part with their only son, they were induced to capitulate. In his many letters home Frank seemed to be quite happy and anxious to get into battle.

Private F. Brice, another to uphold the honor of Nerrigundah, returned last week, invalided home with a shrapnel wound in the chest after doing his bit at the front.

Since January last 40,000 Australians have enlisted for service abroad.

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The Nerrigundah Roll of Honour. The names of three residents mentioned in the article above are on this board – now found in the Bodalla Hall

ARALUEN HERO KILLED – Writes the Araluen correspondent of the “News”:- John Leslie Nunn, who spent his school days in Araluen, where a brother and several uncles reside, answered the great call recently, being killed in action in France. Some months ago the young soldier was shot through the lungs, and apparently must have made a good recovery from the first wound. The young hero was a nephew of Mrs. “Gus” Keating of Mullenderree.

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The Cenotaph at Araluen

Eighteen 100 years ago booklets containing articles for the years 1899 to 1916 are available ($5 ea) from the Society’s rooms. Copies of local newspapers from the 1860s to date can be viewed at the Society’s Family History Research Centre (Ph 4474 3224) situated at the rear of the Museum in Campbell St. Moruya (www.mdhs.org.au).

The Moruya Museum houses a collection of furniture, books, artefacts and memorabilia that is intended to show visitors something of the lives of the ordinary people of this community from the middle of the nineteenth century. Most items on display were donated by local families.

To explore the museum’s online collection click here.

Sales Day

The Moruya and District Historical Society will be holding a Plants, Cakes and Preserves Sales Day on Saturday, October 28, from 9am to 2pm at the Museum, 85 Campbell Street, Moruya.

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Shire-wide news extracts from the Moruya Examiner of 20 October 1917, provided by the Moruya & District Historical Society:

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Madame Olga Petrova was born Muriel Harding in England

MADAME PETROVA in her latest and greatest success The Waiting Soul, Star Theatre tonight.

INCOME TAX – Several city people have been fined £50 for not sending in Income Tax returns.

SCARCITY OF NEWSPAPER – “Everything comes to those wait”, (says Pambula “Voice”.) “After two year we received a bale of paper on Tuesday last.”

KIORA FACTORY – During August 4324 gallons of milk equalling 4443 standard gallons were delivered at the Kiora Factory.

MORUYA FACTORY – During August 16286 gallons of milk, equalling 15539 Standard gallons, were delivered at the Moruya Factory.

MINING – We are informed on reliable information that Messrs. G. H. James and C. Stubbs, jun., have purchased Mr. Harry Wendon’s Donkey Hill gold reef. This reef has been worked for many years past by Mr. Wenden, only in a small way, and has always been a paying, and in fact a profitable, proposition. May the new proprietors unearth fortunes, which is quite possible in such an auriferous locality.

HONOR ROLL – Word has been received by his parents, who live at Comerang, Bodalla, that Private J. Hunt, who enlisted from Bodalla had been killed in action on the 28th of September. This brave hero leaves a young wife, a daughter of Mr. and Mrs. J. Balwin, and an infant son.

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The Roll Of Honour at Bodalla has Private James Hunt on it.

IRONBARK ATTACKED – A serious condition has developed in State Forests on the North Coast as a result of the appearance and spread of a lerp insect, which is destroying the ironbark timber and defying the efforts of the forestry officials to combat it. The data it has been possible to collect does not enable the Government scientists to identify the insect sufficiently to enable them to prescribe an antidote.

VITAL STATISTICS – Following are the district statistics registered at Moruya for the quarter ending 29th day of September, 1917: – Marriages 3; Births, males 9, females 11, total 20 ; Deaths, males 5, females 2, total 7.

PRISONER OF WAR – Mrs. Molloy, of Mogo, has received a letter from one of her two sons who went to the war, Harry, stating that he was a prisoner of war in Gustrow, Germany. Private Harry, who is doing road work for the enemy, reckons that he is not getting the New South Wales award rates at his new occupation.

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Allied prisoners of war Gustrow camp, Germany, Ernst Grantzow. Image courtesy Australian War Memoria

FAREWELLED – On Friday evening of last week two of the oldest and most highly respected residents of the district, Mr. and Mrs. M. Morris ( who have relinquished business and are going to reside in Sydney) were tendered a farewell in the Convent School-room. A large gathering assembled to do honor to the departing guests. Mr. R. B. Heffernan on behalf of the R.C. parishioners presented Mr. Morris with a suit case and his good wife with a handbag containing a cheque. Mr. Morris suitably responded.

NAROOMA. – WAR CHEST DAY – A successful function was held here for War Chest Day in a sale of gifts and social etc. Donations in cash and kind were collected on both sides of the Wagonga, the collectors being the Misses D. O’Connor, N. Thomson, A. Wollett, V. Bettini, Joyce Stroud and Mrs. Barry. Mr. G. Thomson, our local auctioneer, as usual performed his duties gratuitously and disposed of many items in quick time. Mrs Morris and her staff of willing helpers presided at the refreshment room which was well patronised. Mrs. G. Sykes presided at the chamber of horrors, viz., exhibiting war trophies from the battlefields of France which had been sent home by her son who is at the front. This was well attended, it being a very interesting feature. The social at night was also well patronised and a jolly evening was spent, raffles, etc., being indulged in during the lulls in dancing. The School of Arts light, which has just been fitted out with the Gloria, made everything much brighter. The function netted about £53 for the War Chest Day.

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A full block of 1917 “War Chest” stamps. The stamps were designed by Harry John Weston, a popular artist of the time.

Eighteen 100 years ago booklets containing articles for the years 1899 to 1916 are available ($5 ea) from the Society’s rooms. Copies of local newspapers from the 1860s to date can be viewed at the Society’s Family History Research Centre (Ph 4474 3224) situated at the rear of the Museum in Campbell St. Moruya (www.mdhs.org.au).

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Shire-wide news extracts from the Moruya Examiner of 13 October 1917, provided by the Moruya & District Historical Society:

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Louise Mack

LouiseMackLOUISE MACK –  There is coming to Moruya shortly one of the most remarkable personalities of the war. This is Miss Louise Mack, the pretty and charming little lady who has been thrilling crowded houses all over Australia with her wonderful recital: “What I saw in the war.” Miss Mack holds her audiences spell-bound wherever she goes. Her experiences were amazing. She went right through the German lines into the occupied city of Brussels, where she met that heroic figure, Edith Cavell.

HELP our poor and sick by attending the Hospital Ball on Wednesday night next.

HUT ROBBER – Sergt. Branch was out on Saturday searching for the robber, who has been visiting lonely huts and camps in Wadbillija, Tanto and Nerrigundah. A description of the man was furnished the police by a Cobargo resident who saw him on the eve of the robbery at Mr. W. Thompson’s hut. The stranger appears to be about 30 years of age and speaks with a foreign accent. The Sergeant was accompanied by Bill Brennan, of Wadbillija, noted for his bush lore, whose hut had been pillaged. They tracked the robber to Belowra and had to give up about 8 p.m. owing to the darkness.

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A typical slab hut of the time

DOG REGISTRATION – Today is the last day’s grace allowed for the registration of bow-wows. Forms obtainable at this office.

SCHOOL CLOSED – Owing to the resignation of the teacher, Miss Alice Jenner, and the paucity of attendance of pupils the Newstead School has again been closed.

OFF TO FIGHT – Our old friend, Mr. Alf Crapp writing from Woolgoola says. “Enlisted and gone into camp please continue sending the “Examiner” to Mrs. Crapp, and kindly remember me to all my friends.”

PROPERTY SALE – Mr. M. Morris has disposed of his property in Queen St., the shop and land occupied by Messrs. Cheesman Bros. and land occupied by Mr. C. Rochsey, the purchaser being Mr. A. F. Emmott.

DEATH – On Friday morning last an old man named William Kasey, who had been ailing for some time, was found dead in his bed at Mr. H. Anderson’s residence. The deceased who was about 70 years of age, and an Englishman, had been working on the Bergalia Estate for a number of years. The remains were interred on Saturday in the Methodist portion of the Moruya Cemetery, the Rev. E. S. Henderson, in the absence of the Rev. J. A. Walsh, officiating.

PERSONAL AND OTHERWISE  (War News) –

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Pvt, Leslie Stuart James Ross

– In his last letter to his parents, Mr. and Mrs. J. L. Ross, Pte. Leslie Ross says that he is now at Queen’s College, Oxford studying for a pilot in the Aerial Corps

– Mr. Horace Head, late assistant teacher at the Public School, Moruya, is the latest local recruit to don khaki.

– Pte. V. Edwards, of Central Tilba who has just returned from the front minus an arm, received an enthusiastic public welcome home.

– Amongst the 340th list of killed in action during the week appeared the name of Pte. Edwin Ernest Woollett, Narooma, previously reported missing.

– Corporal Ethelbert Jenner, of Newstead, who has been with the Army Medical Corps at the front since the first year of the war, is expected home shortly

DEUA RIVER

– Miss Maud Mallon of Merricumbene drew a substantial cash prize in in Tattersalls’ sweep on the Spring Handicap recently at Randwick.

– We are pleased to state that Mr. “Paddy” Minihan, who was confined to his room last week, has resumed work at the Mt. Waddell mine.

– The many friends of Mrs. Thomas Cooper, of Crown Flat, Araluen, will regret to learn that she is in a poor state of health. She has, we understand, decided to go to Sydney in order to seek more skilful medical advice. Mrs. Cooper is a sister to Mr. “Glasgow” McIntosh, of Larry’s Point.

– Mr. George Turner snr. has gone to Moruya to undergo a course of treatment with Mr. R. Mehl for sciatica.

Eighteen 100 years ago booklets containing articles for the years 1899 to 1916 are available ($5 ea) from the Society’s rooms. Copies of local newspapers from the 1860s to date can be viewed at the Society’s Family History Research Centre (Ph 4474 3224) situated at the rear of the Museum in Campbell St. Moruya (www.mdhs.org.au).